life between the pages

“I spent my life folded between the pages of books.
In the absence of human relationships I formed bonds with paper characters. I lived love and loss through stories threaded in history; I experienced adolescence by association. My world is one interwoven web of words, stringing limb to limb, bone to sinew, thoughts and images all together. I am a being comprised of letters, a character created by sentences, a figment of imagination formed through fiction.”
Tahereh Mafi, Shatter Me

Thursday, June 23, 2005

presto chango! coming to a farm near you...

did you see that
horse turn into a
cat?


WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that local governments may seize people's homes and businesses — even against their will — for private economic development.

It was a decision fraught with huge implications for a country with many areas, particularly the rapidly growing urban and suburban areas, facing countervailing pressures of development and property ownership rights.
The 5-4 ruling represented a defeat for some Connecticut residents whose homes are slated for destruction to make room for an office complex. They argued that cities have no right to take their land except for projects with a clear public use, such as roads or schools, or to revitalize blighted areas.
Rest of article at
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050623/ap_on_go_su_co/scotus_seizing_property

Read the complete Supreme Court opinion here:
http://wid.ap.org/documents/scotus/050623kelo.pdf

7 comments:

Favorite Apron said...

How very sad. The only consolation is that nature will win in the end.

Bill said...

While I understand the concern, as a planner by background and someone dealing with neighborhood issues, I am afraid that this situation will result in an overreaction in the public and legislative mind that will badly damage our efforts to improve communities that truly are in need. For instance, In our South Carolina city we’re working on a very concentrated level. In some cases acquisition of much needed properties might require eminent domain for several reasons. No, we’re not creating shopping centers or handing the property over to a corporation, but we might hand it over to another entity for development of homes or whatever to improve the area. I think we need to be careful about pushing too hard and working legislators up into a frenzy that will only backfire on communities that are trying to do the right thing.

Having said that, we almost never use the authority here at all… most places in SC don’t. It’s not politically palatable anyway in the nation’s most conservative property rights state. It’s more often than not the highway department or the State in some other capacity that utilizes the power of E. D. We’re not Oregon, or Washington…

Just trying to calm the rhetoric a bit, nothing more…

Rurality said...

Totally disgusting. Talk about the Golden Rule (he who has the gold...)

Bill said...

I'm not sure I'm following you, Rurality? What precisely is digusting? Perhaps I did not make clearly explain my position. I detest welfare for the rich, which in many cases we're seeing here and around the country as local governments hungry for tax dollars and working on the long ago discredited assumption that all growth is good, provide ridiculous incentives to wealthy developers. We would never claim private property for someone else's private development. Ain't gonna happen. Nor should it.

Sorry if you misunderstood my cautionary note.

Bill said...

My point is that if we obtain property for someone else to develop, it's under our control, and to this date it has never involved imminent domain.

sophronia_ said...

sorry, bill.... planners do not agree at all on this. many view it as a black eye. see today's posting for further comments.

Bill said...

I do understand the down side to the Supreme Court decision... by raising the cackles of the property rights advocates during a time when conservative republicans control Congress and the White House is counter productive for true planning interests. We can expect legislation at the federal level and perhaps additional efforts at the State level around the country to restrict land use management efforts. I do fear the repercussions. Oh, and urban renewal ain't what it used to be. Communities I'm familiar with are doing some fascinating things with community redevelopment, with a focus on reviving, not destroying, old neighborhoods....